R Burnier

This article was originally published in The Theosophist, the international journal of the TS, October 1982.

It is important to grasp, not merely as a concept, but as a fact, that the Path is oneself. The Voice of the Silence states that one cannot travel on the Path until one has become the Path itself. The Path is the qualitative change which takes place in one’s consciousness and in the vehicles through which consciousness functions.

It is said that consciousness, in its absolute form, is ever pure and that no change can, or needs to, take place in it. But ‘consciousness’ is an ambiguous term. The Sanskrit chaitanya is more accurate and indicates the ever pure, ever free, unlimited consciousness which does not change. Eastern philosophy speaks of two kinds of truth: one is paramarthika satya, absolute truth; the other is vyavaharika satya, relative truth. From the absolute point of view, consciousness cannot change, but, from the relative point of view, change must take place. Consciousness is identified with and entrammelled by the material vehicles through which it acts and, practically speaking, works in ways which are not natural to itself. It is unable to express its natural purity and freedom so long as these vehicles are not made into perfect instruments able to respond to its every vibration.

Theosophical studies show that all the bodies—physical, emotional and mental—have their own consciousness. In fact, every particle in every body, as a living unit, has its own consciousness, for life, functioning at its own level and in an appropriate manner, is found in all matter. The aggregate which is the body—whether it is the physical, emotional or mental aggregate—also has a consciousness of its own. There is also a further aggregate which is the physical-astral-mental body consciousness, and which is the ‘personality’ of man in Theosophy.

Lecture delivered at the 116th International Convention at Adyar, December 1991. Originally published in The Theosophist, February 1992.

“True Occultism or Theosophy is the ‘Great Renunciation of the self,’ unconditionally and absolutely, in thought as in action.” All the manifestations of the separative self, whether they are intensive and obvious, subtle or dormant, cloud the understanding and intelligence. At their worst, they completely distort the view, making the individual see his environment in terms of his own ambition, pride or envy. At their mildest, they still bar the gates of perception into the hidden meaning, splendor and beauty which is the heart of existence, concealed in the very being of all, both in the animate and the inanimate. Only when the taint of selfhood is completely washed away does Wisdom bloom in all its perfection, and that which was secret before becomes as the light of day …

Religion, from the Theosophical point of view, commences with the denuding of the mind of its favored thoughts and conditioning and allowing it to come into contact with what is of universal and fundamental significance. The impact of the Society on world conditions would be outstanding if its worldwide membership were composed of true altruists, a body exemplifying brotherhood, men and women seeking Wisdom and leading the life necessary to widen the horizons of the mind and obtain insight into truth. It is those who are drawn towards such objectives who are worthy candidates for membership.”

Inaugural Address, 1980

 

Radha S. Burnier, respectfully called "Radhaji", was born in Adyar, Chennai, India, on the grounds of the Theosophical Society (Adyar) on November 15 , 1923, into a Theosophical family. She was the daughter of Mr. Nilakanta Sri Ram, who was the fifth international president of the organization, and Srimati Bhagirathi, who was also an active member of the Society. Although she was born a Brahmin, her family did not follow the exclusivist customs attached to their caste but adhered to the Theosophical ideal of universal brotherhood.

Radha was a third-generation Theosophist. Her grandfather, A. Nilakanta Sastri, was an early member of the Society, much inspired by the Founders of the Society when they came to India and Madras.

Below is a presentation give by Radhaji while visiting New Zealand:  

The Innocent Wise Man

Radha Burnier (15 November 1923 – 31 October 2013) was born in Adyar, India. She was president of the Theosophical Society Adyar from 1980 until her death in 2013. She was General Secretary of the Indian Section of the Society between 1960 and 1978. Radha Burnier was the daughter of Nilakanta Sri Ram who was the fifth President of the T.S. Adyar.

Below is a presentation given by Radha Burnier while in New Zealand:

Listen to the presention:  The Two Levels of Truth

Radha Burnier (née Radha Sri Ram) (November 15, 1923 – October 31, 2013) was the seventh international president of the Theosophical Society (Adyar). Having taken office in 1980, she was the longest standing president of the organization (33 years).

This is a presentation by R. Burnier while in New Zealand:

Listen to the audio presentation:  Ever New Theosophy

Radha Burnier (née Radha Sri Ram) (November 15, 1923 – October 31, 2013) was the seventh international president of the Theosophical Society (Adyar). Having taken office in 1980, she was the longest standing president of the organization (33 years).

This is a presentation by R. Burnier while in New Zealand:

Listen to the audio of the presentation:  The Future of Humanity

Radha Burnier speaks on The Challenge to Compassionate Action.

Listen to the talk: The Challenge to Compassionate Action

Subscribe to R Burnier

Terms and Conditions

Society Obects

  1. To form a nucleus of the universal brotherhood of humanity, without distinction of race, creed, sex, caste, or colour.
  2. To encourage the study of comparative religion, philosophy and science.
  3. To investigate unexplained laws of nature and the powers latent in humanity.

Contact

Address

The Theosophical Society.
Adyar,
600 020 Chennai,
India
Contact Page
Go to top