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Written as a sequel to The Initiate, the Pupil, as Scott called himself, reconnects with his master, Justin Moreward Haig, after not seeing him for many years. Scott is invited to leave London to stay in Boston, where Justin Moreward Haig is teaching about thirty other students. As in The Initiate, Scott related his experiences as if he were keeping a diary, so that this second book is also a teaching story. For example, the master discusses concentration, meditation, and contemplating, telling the Pupil, let people meditate often but only for short periods of time. It is better to meditate, say, ten times a day for a few moments or even less, than a whole hour in succession. Or, With regard to purity-what we mean by the word is not prudery but the exact opposite. Purity is the power to see the beautiful in all things and all functions of life, and to glorify all actions by the spirit of unselfishness.

The book is divided into two parts: an anthology entitled "Justin Morewood Haig" and describing a mysterious person identified only by that pseudonym through a series of anecdotal stories, and a parable illustrating certain principles of occult philosophy entitled “The Circuitous Journey.”

Virtually all the attention drawn by the book has centered on the person and identity of Haig, who is asserted to be a real person (a “very well known Englishman”) who was living in London at the time the book was written. The author of the book claims to have become friends with Haig and to have found him to be a most remarkable individual—an initiate or adept, in occult terms. The anecdotes illustrate the somewhat unconventional philosophy held by Haig through the retelling of various meetings and encounters with him and with others, whom Haig usually tries to advise in spiritual or philosophical terms, with varying results.

Published in The American Theosophist, November 1970

The word “meditation” stands for a large variety of mental exercises adopted by people who have a spiritual ideal of one kind or another in their lives and want to realize this ideal, at least to some extent. As the mental activity and discipline involved in meditation is of very wide scope, it is not easy to deal here with the subject systematically and comprehensively. Those who read this article are expected to be familiar with the general aspects of meditation. We shall therefore confine ourselves to the discussion of a few interesting aspects of meditation, which are not generally understood, but are of vital interest to those who are serious about the problems of the inner life and do not want to go through their meditation as a mere routine.

 

The late Paul Brunton was one of the 20th century's greatest explorers of and writers on the spiritual traditions of the East. A Search in Secret India is the story of Paul Brunton's journey around India, living among yogis, mystics, and gurus, some of whom he found convincing, others not. He finally finds the peace and tranquility which come with self-knowledge when he meets and studies with the great sage Sri Ramana Maharishi.
 
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